GTFS-ride for transit ridership data: Learning from the GTFS Example

To develop shared languages for interoperable transit data, the question we face is not just how to invent data formats, but how to create standards and the systems around them. People ask “How can we have success on the scale of GTFS without Google?” This is an important question that state departments of transportation (DOTs), in…

Transit Custom Posts: A WordPress Plugin for Transit Sites

One of the remarkable things about an open data specification such as GTFS is that it finds itself in all kinds of places—from trip-planners and mapping applications to network planning software. Now, it has infiltrated website development thanks to a grant from ODOT through the Northwest Oregon Transit Alliance (NWOTA). We’re excited to announce the…

“Alpha release” of the Flexible Trip Planner

In March we visited Vermont, and heard directly from the public transit agencies in the state about what their main goals for the new statewide trip planner were. We followed up in April with conversations with each agency to understand in depth the services they offer, and how they deliver those services to Vermont riders.…

A Consortium Approach to Transit Data Interoperability

Earlier in 2016, I posted a transportation data specifications & gaps roundup on the Trillium blog. Our increasingly complicated and powerful multimodal transportation network is missing important pieces because there are not standardized agreed on data formats to describe various modes (like demand-responsive transportation) and to support various functions (like fare payment). Rocky Mountain Institute…