Announcing the flexible transit trip planner

The trip planner revolution Trip planners based off GTFS data have revolutionized public transit in the United States. Just 12 years ago, the only trip planners were expensive, proprietary, poorly functioning, and designed for individual systems. Now, a “Google Trip Planner” widget is ubiquitous on the websites of larger agencies and common even for systems with…

Transitland, towards a more robust open-source transit software stack — interview with Drew Dara-Abrams

Transitland is opening up doors to conveniently find and use transit data (see Thomas’s earlier June 2016 Trillium blog post on Transitland). To get a full understanding of the Transitland project, its ambitions, and the opportunities it is opening, I talked with Drew Dara-Abrams (Twitter: @drewdaraabrams), head of mobility products at Mapzen. Below is the full text of our interview. Thank you, Drew, for…

GTFS and its potential around the world

The World Bank and other international development agencies have recognized the value of interoperable transportation data formats — GTFS in particular — for improving traveler information resources and transportation system planning processes around the world. The February 2015 Urban Transport and ICT Capacity Building (PDF) report is worth a read. This is Holly Krambeck‘s completion report on the World Bank’s efforts…

Multimodal transportation data formats (& gaps) roundup, July 2016

How do we describe the whole transportation network? Introduction: towards comprehensive data The multimodal transportation network is greater than the sum of its parts. Abundant mode options — including public transit, bikeshare, carshare, ride hailing (TNC), rideshare, and vanpool — complement each other to serve different travel needs efficiently. But a transportation network with so many dimensions…